Tag Archive for: purpose-driven PR

What makes someone a public relations expert? In a world where the definition of PR  can be wildly vast, how can one person be an expert in everything? I would propose there are many types of experts, and you need them all in your ecosystem because they support one another and you in different ways. This identification methodology works for any agency. Fundamentally, it’s why agencies exist: to connect you to experts. Finding an agency can be a real drag – and ultimately, what’s most important is who will be on your team. An expert team is the difference between PR success and PR flops. But if you’ve never hired a PR agency, you might be confused about what to look for in a PR agency. Ultimately, an agency is only as good as its team. So, what should you be looking for in an outstanding PR agency team, and what defines a public relations expert?

 

PR Strategist Experts

This is the most senior of PR experts. They’ve probably worked their way through multitudes of specializations from B2B Tech PR to Consumer PR and verticals. They’ve seen content platforms come and go, understand the ebb and flow of media, and dialed in enough to ideate on the spot while having a big enough picture to discuss plans a year or more in advance.  Because they know today’s dynamic communication environment, strategists are typically fans of data-informed strategies.

PR Strategists can also evaluate time/trends/budget to provide insights on what to expect and how to improve outcomes. No one likes it when I say, “Anything is possible with the right combination of time and trends,” because it makes it sound like things are out of your control. They are and aren’t – PR strategists are excellent at reading the tea leaves and providing recommendations that mitigate risk and optimize opportunity.

In short, your PR strategist expert has a 100,000-foot view of the media landscape and how a particular company can stand out.

PR Strategies Experts are defined by these attributes:

  • uses data to inform strategies
  • defines metrics and KPIs within the context of time and budget
  • maintains knowledge of current and upcoming platforms
  • understands the impact of current news, economy, and policy on an array of verticals 
  • has extensive business experience with a variety of outcomes, from raising capital to increasing awareness to IPO and investor relations

Account PR Experts

Account experts see the big picture of multiple moving parts and know how they fit into the strategy. As a more on-the-ground PR expert, they’re funneling up day-to-day information and news to make sure everyone is engaged in changes that may require shifts in the plan. PR Account experts are also most engaged with the client’s brand – they’re the de facto voice for the client in an agency. They should have the clearest understanding of who the brand is and isn’t and can articulate brand guardrails to ensure any work represents the brand. Account PR experts will also likely identify brand inconsistencies and recommend corrective actions.  As strategic implementors, they will be the first to identify impracticalities and challenges to a strategy and will work directly with a PR strategist to develop a pivot where it’s needed.  PR Account experts are outstanding communicators and are proactive with ideas and collaboration, as well as managing timelines and campaign calendars.

PR Account Experts are defined by these attributes:

  • understand how daily indicators may impact strategy
  • identifies and mediates day-to-day challenges in the implementation
  • acts as a brand defender within the agency
  • can identify brand inconsistencies and recommend remedies

Specialist PR Experts

There is a perception that specialists aren’t as experienced as strategists. That isn’t necessarily the case. Our 100% executive-level team includes specialists with 10 and 15 years of experience in their specialty. Specialists love a specific part of PR and communications and focus on it exclusively. Whether that specialty is something like influencer management, ghostwriting, media relations, or social media, the PR and marketing world needs expert PR specialists. They’re the most engaged on the ground, and they can tell you things like emerging topics over the last 24 hours, trending hashtags, or whether anyone is even using emojis anymore. Experienced PR specialist experts understand the ebb and flow of tech; they know how to navigate the details and have tactical solutions and ideas on ways to polish outputs for the audience, platform, or trend. Without PR specialist experts, everything would feel less personalized, on-trend, and ham-fisted. The specialist takes strategy and gives it life.

Your agency team may have numerous specialist PR experts. For example, you could have a technical SEO specialist, a media relations specialist, a social media or community management specialist, or a cyber security mitigation specialist who helps you plan for a PR crisis.

Specialist PR Experts are defined by these attributes:

  • deep understanding of platform communication intricacies
  • deep understanding of the key players within a topic
  • can identify trends and articulate their importance to the strategy
  • can quickly navigate multiple technology platforms

Having a team of PR experts at your disposal is critical to PR success. Every member of your team has an important role to play, and every role adds perspective to the strategy and implementation. Part of the Avaans Media white glove experience is tailoring your team to your strategy. Talk to us today about your specific PR expert needs.

Consumers no longer prefer brands that incorporate environmental initiatives – they demand it. It is no longer a novel feature reserved for what was once labeled ‘eco’ brands but is widely expected from consumers regardless of the industry. Still, there is additional pressure on consumer brands within the health, lifestyle, pharma, skin, and wellness sectors to prioritize sustainable, social, and environmentally conscious practices. So it’s important to know the difference between purpose-driven PR vs greenwashing.

But there’s still a critical gap between legitimately incorporating sustainable and social initiatives and how you communicate this to consumers. Cue purpose driven PR, your brand communication strategy that allows you to leverage the brand recognition and awareness that specific eco-friendly values hold for your company. But brands beware – despite best intentions, without careful execution and communication, your attempts may be misinterpreted as ‘greenwashing.’ Here’s what you need to know about the latter and how to avoid it at all costs.

What is Purpose Driven PR?

Purpose-driven PR encompasses the earned media coverage around a brand relevant to its corporate social responsibility. This content can include anything from the industry’s involvement in climate change and sustainability initiatives to any eco-friendly switches the company makes (like in packaging, shipping, or manufacturing). Investing in successful purpose driven PR strategies, however, goes far beyond improving consumer loyalty to their brands.

In fact, according to a recent poll of 1,048 Americans, 55% stated that they would spend extra on sustainable and eco-friendly products. On the contrary, 4 in 10 said they are likely to boycott companies that aren’t as committed to turning green – a definitive motivation from a sales perspective. Even more so from a brand awareness standpoint, as proven in a new global analysis commissioned by WWF, indicating a 71 percent increase in internet searches for sustainable goods internationally over the last five years.

Some refer to it as ‘the eco-wakening,’ but be forewarned, despite the advantages of purpose-driven PR from a business perspective – consumers are as quick as ever to spot a wolf in sheep’s clothing, a.k.a’ greenwashing.’

When it becomes ‘greenwashing’

Greenwashing is the antithesis of purpose-driven PR and refers to brands leveraging the economic value of purpose-driven initiatives and related PR without necessarily genuinely living up to the standards. However, it’s important to remember that this may not always be intentional. Often, consumer brands are labeled as ‘greenwashing’ due to a lack of knowledge on how to approach purpose-driven PR successfully. One example of this may be consumer brands who use vague language concerning their eco-friendly product, such as ‘all-natural’ or ‘made with clean products’ or ‘recycled materials’ instead of descriptive, informative, and transparent language. They avoid transparency around their supply chain and focus on a tiny sustainable change to distract from other harmful practices while overlooking the company’s broader environmental impact.

How brands can avoid greenwashing

Recent studies on U.S. consumers revealed an ever-increasing trust gap between consumers and brands, especially pertaining to sustainability. In fact, merely 38 percent of surveyed consumers believe brands and their promises concerning environmental sustainability. There is a dire need for credible, authoritative, third-party publicity to bridge the trust gap and establish your brand as a true north regarding its green messaging. This is where appropriate PR strategies can play a significant role.

In the interim, there are a few things consumer brands can keep in mind to avoid greenwashing, such as utilizing deliberate, clear, and accurate language and avoiding generic assertions such as “organic” unless the product is certified organic.

But there’s a catch.

Conversely, consumers are attracted to simple, jargon-free sustainability messages that connect directly to them, their families, and the world around them.

By keeping this in mind, consumers must find a natural and healthy balance between communicating authentically and accurately without becoming so far removed from their ideal consumer’s frame of reference.

Our opinion? If you can’t prove it, don’t use it. But you have to be a part of the conversation, or it’s only a matter of time before your competitors surpass you.

On the surface, it might seem that purpose-driven companies differ vastly from hyper-growth companies or emerging industries, but nothing could be further from the truth. Purpose-driven perspectives for hyper-growth and emerging industries is actually imperative to future success. Fast-growing brands and purpose overlap in critical phases in a company’s or industry’s growth. Because fast-growing companies and emerging industries are closer to their customers and in the earlier phases of culture-building, purpose is more clear, and it’s actually the perfect time to codify purpose so as scale occurs, the purpose isn’t lost.

 

What Do Fast-Growing Companies and Purpose-Driven Initiatives Have in Common?

Reaching for a bigger idea, for a better way, and for bold innovation is something ambitious and hyper-growth companies and purpose-driven initiatives share. The most ambitious entrepreneurs are driven by something bigger than themselves, or even riches. They’re driven to change the world with a big idea. Big ideas require a special blend of inspiration and persuasion to inspire early adopters.  It doesn’t matter whether the company is B2B or B2C, early adopters are critical, and so is an inspiration. Purpose-driven initiatives inspire and engage as well.

Purpose-driven approaches and ambitious companies also share the need to inspire trust, and that’s what PR does better than any other medium. PR is the tool the world’s most trusted brands lean on to improve their reputations and create a connection with their customers. PR lasts longer than a commercial, it’s more trusted, and it gives ambitious brands the opportunity to tell nuanced and deeper stories.

Isn’t Social Impact too Expensive for Growth?

While fast-growing companies have certain cultural requirements: creativity, flexibility, and drive, none limit purpose. This very question assumes that growth only happens when hustle culture dominates. We have many clients thriving in purpose without the debilitating effects of hustle culture. But even if your company is incubating a hustle culture mentality, when the stakes are higher than ever, people need a higher purpose that inspires them. So it’s important for companies in the growth stage to double down on brand and product purpose. In fact, purpose may be a matter of survival, and not just PR for hypergrowth companies. At least according to Larry Fink at Blackrock who has for years been advocating for brands to implement purpose in order to grow.

Further, purpose is an expectation of GenZ and Millenials, that companies embrace their social, cultural, and environmental responsibilities. Further, employees are increasingly choosing employers based on the company’s beliefs and values. So, recruiting the best talent will if not now, eventually, require companies and industries to double down on purpose.

One example of this is the emerging vertical of the cannabis industry. The cannabis industry is founded in activism, but when the industry codified as states legalized THC, the industry doubled down on purpose, taking on the social injustice of cannabis prisoners in the Last Prisoners Project. And the cannabis industry is exploding, so there’s a clear precedent for growth and purpose. Brands who take on purpose and a higher power super charge their hyper-growth.

Another example is cleantech an emerging industry with an inherent social impact. From a corporate storytelling perspective, the biggest issue cleantech companies face isn’t whether to incorporate social impact messaging, but rather, how to differentiate themselves from competitors who are also tapping into social impact.

Finally – according to the Fortune Return on Leadership survey, the world’s biggest companies experience productivity and profitability benefits by incorporating purpose and impact.

When Do Hyper-Growth Companies Need to Define Purpose?

Growth stage companies have an advantage: history doesnt’ hinder them. Existing companies often have to go through an intense reorganization to discover and fulfill purpose. For hyper-growth companies or emerging industries, the time to determine purpose is now. Elevating your company’s biggest aspirations in alignment with today’s social, cultural, and environmental challenges is a key growth strategy. Both private and institutional investors are analyzing a company’s social impact before they ever commit to investing, and this trend shows no sign of slowing down.

Larry Fink, CEO and chairperson of the multinational investment firm BlackRock, created a tectonic shift in 2018 when he said, “To prosper over time, every company must not only deliver financial performance but also show how it contributes positively to society.” In his 2021 letter to CEOs, he said, “It is clear that being connected to stakeholders — establishing trust with them and acting with purpose — enables a company to understand and respond to the changes happening in the world. Companies ignore stakeholders at their peril — companies that do not earn this trust will find it harder and harder to attract customers and talent, especially as young people increasingly expect companies to reflect their values.”

Defining, developing and implementing purpose is step one to ensuring a company’s strategic growth.

How Does Purpose-Driven PR Help Companies in Hyper-Growth?

A challenge many fast-growing businesses, especially those in emerging industries, face is brand building. Purpose is a considerable portion of a brand and while it gives internal and external stakeholders corporate structure, it also lends itself to authentic storytelling, which greatly aids in securing media coverage. For many companies in competitive emerging industries, PR is an important differentiator for those with industry-leading aspirations from brand domination to IPO.

 

With all the advantages of purpose-driven initiatives for fast-growing companies. The question is reall- can fast-growing companies afford NOT to define a greater purpose? We’ve been working shoulder to shoulder with our clients on purpose-driven communications and PR since 2008. From movements to politics to social impact, our success stories speak for themselves. Contact us today to get started.

Recently, Google polled 3,000 Americans to find out how they responded to sustainability messaging. As more brands make efforts to become more sustainable or even start any sort of purpose-driven communications,  these four tips will help you communicate purpose-driven messaging effectively. 

Today’s consumers are smarter about messaging. Millennials, the first digitally native generation, are grown-ups, and have their own kids. Gen X (now called Zoomers), see right through greenwashing. They can smell inauthenticity and they actively bristle at brands leveraging purpose-driven messaging to improve their own reputations. And they are right to be skeptical. According to a Google study global survey of top-level executives 59% admitted to overstating — or inaccurately representing — their sustainability activities. Whoa. That’s not a trust-first strategy at all.

So how can well-meaning brands celebrate purpose-driven messaging like sustainability, and awareness days like Earth Day, without alienating their customers?

Communicate Sustainable Efforts with Plain Language

Purpose-driven messaging is nuanced, but sustainability messaging is quite difficult because sometimes an effort to be sustainable has unintended, non-sustainable results. Yet, it’s important to be clear and honest when discussing your company’s efforts.

One way to do this is to share your sustainability goals and roadmap and be candid about your yearly progress. An annual purpose-driven progress report that is open and available on your website allows your customers to come on the journey with you. And explaining how to you took action and the implications helps consumers understand the complications.

Let me tell you a story. Many years ago, I had a client who created disposable compostable plates and utensils. Before we could even get into messaging, I had to take a mini science lesson because compostable can be problematic due to chemicals used to breakdown items like this, yet using products like this is still better than using plastic that ends up in the landfill, right?

Everyone agreed that anything misleading would destroy trust. We landed on a simple outcome everyone can understand: less plastic is better. And this was a fantastic choice because everyone can clearly understand that we have a plastic problem, and it creates an awareness of a bigger issue that the brand is trying to tackle.  Today if I had that client, we would dig deeper and be even more transparent, but this was 2009, and we were barely scratching the surface of how complicated “sustainable” really is to achieve.

Simple is better. Honest is better. Transparent is better. 

 

Celebrate The Accessible

What creates change? From a sustainable messaging standpoint, we’re past awareness. In 2009, Harvard Business Review study found cost is one key reason people don’t adopt sustainable practices. Things like EVs and solar panels are financially inaccessible, to say nothing of the fact that the nations 44 million renters can’t do either of these things.

But what is one thing everyone can do? Reuse. That’s something to celebrate, and it’s accessible to millions of people. Folgers recently did a commercial about reusing its glass jars; I like this because I think it’s on-point to their consumer. The ad incorporated a touch of nostalgia which was effective too. On the flip side, in a recent AdAge podcast, some creatives slightly skewered the video by asking, “What about the plastic lid?” which I think misses the point. The point is: when you remind your customers of the accessible ways they can make a difference, it empowers them.

Focus on small, actionable, concrete actions that you can celebrate alongside your customers. 

Dire Threats Aren’t Effective

“When asked to describe “actions or attitudes that could make people feel bad about their impact on the environment,” many U.S. survey respondents pointed to images of landscapes ruined by trash, fires, or pollution, while some pointed to images of animal suffering.”

Not only does messaging like this put the consumer in a terrible position, it’s disempowering. This kind of messaging is increasingly ineffective because consumers have had it with feeling bad about a gigantic problem that they, as an individual, can’t personally solve alone. And why is the burden even on the consumer all the time anyway? What is the business doing internally?

Instead, focus on positive outcomes. Before and after pictures of rooftop gardens, clean parks, these are all uplifting images that send a positive, impactful message. 

Use Educated Consumers to Your Advantage

Sustainability has become political. It’s that simple. For example, according to Harvard Business Review:

“Republicans were less likely to buy a compact fluorescent light bulb that they knew was more energy-efficient than an incandescent bulb when it was labeled “Protect the Environment” than when that label was missing.”

Most consumers who want a sustainable bulb know incandescent bulbs are more sustainable. But instead of pointing to the environmental benefits, labeling incandescent bulbs as more energy efficient is effective for a wider range of consumers. Everyone can see the benefits of saving energy, whether for sustainability or economic benefit.

Without a plan and consideration for the pitfalls, purpose-driven communication can do more damage than good. For more recommendations, download our Purpose-Driven Guide, which provides an internal roadmap to avoiding the typical challenges of communicating purpose-driven messages.

What is a Purpose-driven strategy? It’s the natural evolution of four converging cultural changes; the first is when social, cultural, and environmental issues became more visible and urgent, followed by consumers who expect brands to connect with nonprofits or social impact, driven by a lack of confidence in government to solve big problems, and finally, institutional investors evaluating environmental, social governance (ESG). Purpose puts a movement and impact first; the defining commitment of purpose is when it takes precedence over profits. Purpose-driven companies believe when society, the environment, and our collective well-being are doing well—businesses do better too.

Purpose-Driven Strategies have Three Key Pillars:

Employee and Systemic Engagement, Externally Virtuous, Meaty Measurable. 

These pillars of purpose require a company to be engaged in a systemic way, are independent of sales, and the impact should be both audacious and measurable. While purpose-driven strategies may give way to recruiting advantages, brand valuation, and competitive advantages, those are not the driving outcomes behind purpose. Purpose-driven PR is not the driving motivation behind purpose-driven implementations. The defining commitment of purpose is when it takes precedence over profitswhen internal culture is SO strong, so empowered, that decisions at all levels are made with a purpose in mind.

These Purpose Driven Strategy distinctions are important—because consumers—AND Investors are savvier than ever: They see through cause marketing campaigns with little authenticity. They’re alert to saying one thing, but doing another -greenwashing is so common it had a name.  Distrust in governments continued to decrease, while expectations of businesses continued to increase.

Purpose-driven strategies differ from the historical ways brands engaged with movements and nonprofits.

The Difference Between Purpose-Driven and Social Impact

Although used interchangeably sometimes, purpose and social impact are different. What exactly is purpose-driven strategy? It’s a deep, sustained engagement for change by which the company recognizes its own impact, including internally, at the corporate level. Social impact is 100% external and very often involves inspiring a stakeholder community, like customers, to work together for a sustained period. For this reason, businesses usually engage in social impact in partnership with nonprofits.

The Difference Between Purpose Driven Strategies and Philanthropy

The difference between purpose-driven strategies and philanthropy is based on the level of engagement the company commits to. Traditionally philanthropy was a broad term used to describe when a business contributed to a cause – anything from a social nonprofit to funding a building or a program at a college. This giving required very little else from the company outside of the donation. Companies often use philanthropy to attract other monied investors or achieve other strategic goals, but on the surface, having a philanthropic donation very often aligns with a marketing campaign or a PR campaign. Philanthropy also usually had little to do with employees and customer activism or interests.

The Difference Between Purpose Driven Strategies and Corporate Giving

That gave way to CORPORATE GIVING –programs. The United Way is an outstanding example of corporate giving, this is when an organization encourages its employees to unite behind a single cause to create a greater donation scale. At this stage, companies get more involved as multiple departments such as PR, or HR to create systems and messaging around corporate giving. Companies whose employees give a lot receive recognition in the community. Corporate giving gave employees the opportunity to easily give to an organization; some corporate giving programs allow employees to choose a cause that was important to them, but in the most traditional sense, the executive team partnered with a nonprofit to create a corporate giving program.

The Difference Between Purpose Driven Strategies and Cause Marketing

CAUSE MARKETING are initiatives that tied sales to a corporate donation  – started in 1983 when Amex donated a penny to restoring the Statue of Liberty every time someone used their card—cardholders grew 45% and card usage increased by 28%. By 2013, 76% of consumers thought it was OK for brands to support good causes and make money at the same time. Before we knew it, there was a cause marketing campaign everywhere we looked, from pink ribbons to yogurt lids. Enterprises like Hersheys even had internal positions that combined marketing & corporate social responsibility.

If you’re interested in implementing purpose-driven strategies at your company, check out our free guide to implementing purpose. 

Ever since the pandemic, there has been a new emphasis on the emerging industry of telehealth, many of which are on the pre-IPO track. And while telehealth VC investment is expected to stay flat in 2023, the industry received an exciting $29.1 billion in funding in 2021, mostly for consumer tech services and apps, but B2B is also on solid footing. Regardless of funding levels, how has healthtech PR helped hypergrowth brands thrive through the disruptive business environment?

 

Hims/Hers HealthTech and Consumer Goods Maximizes Growth with PR

  • $233 million raised
  • First day of trading: Jan. 21, 2021
  • SPAC proceeds: $280 million
  • SPAC valuation: $1.6 billion, according to Forbes

Hims/Hers operates two websites offering medical services specific to men (Hims) and women (Hers). To catch the attention of VCs and to eventually go public in 2021,  healthtech PR helped hypergrowth tech brand Hims/Hers maximize their most opportune moments. With a total funding amount of $233 million and a successful SPAC IPO, Hims/Hers PR was strategic and purpose-driven, which helped it create consumer trust and make them a media darling at the right time.

Authentic Purpose-Driven PR for HealthTech

In 2021, Hims/Hers followed AirBnB in offering services to displaced Afghan refugees in the wake of the U.S. military’s sudden departure from Afghanistan. Not only did this create trust for their customers, many of whom expect brands to be socially impactful, but they also leveraged tech-based media such as TechCrunch to report the news and capture investors’ imaginations. It may have caught the attention of Walgreens, who missed the chance to contribute when their competitor, Walmart beat them to the punch because three months later, Walgreens started carrying the Hims & Hers personal care products in-store and online.

Targeting Early Adopters with Content

Although it went dark in 2021, Hims/Hers used Medium to own their story, create interest in the early-adopter crowd, and help them navigate the choppy consumer waters during the pandemic. Hims/Hers used Medium to make announcements, and they also hosted Q&As with medical professionals over topics that showed their consumers they understood them and their most personal medical problems.

 

Healthtech Kiira Health Leverages Healthcare PR at Opportune Moments

  • $4 million raised
  • Named one of the most promising startups in 2021 by VCs in Business Insider

Kiira is a healthtech startup that provides an online health clinic to college-aged women with an inclusive and culture-centered approach. The platform provided 24/7 365 access to trusted health experts, including primary care providers, ObGyn, nurse practitioners, and mental health experts. When the pandemic hit, many college-aged women found themselves without access to healthcare. This an especially acute issue because without “adequate resources and guidance, students are at risk for high rates of STDs on campus, unintended pregnancies, adolescent maternal deaths, and other adverse events.” according to CEO and cofounder Crystal Evuleocha, so she teamed up Dr. Candice Fraser, MD FACOG to solve the issue for millions of young women.

Using the Media to Reach Your Target Community

Both co-founders are open about their own experiences with a lack of access to care or questions about how to access care and the dangerous consequences. By leveraging personal stories that speak directly to the organization’s community, the co-founders have shown their audiences that they truly understand them, as they did in Forbes and Essence in 2021.

Moreover, when the founders speak to their community, they stay on message. They share the same information that inspired them to start Kiira Health and they underscore the most pressing issues for young women.

Using Press Releases For Corporate History

Should you issue a press release, or shouldn’t you? One time it’s crystal clear that you should, when there is a big corporate moment that will build your brand credibility with press and/or consumers, as Kiira Health did when it announced its first flagship location in Los Angeles. While press releases aren’t usually the source of media coverage by themselves, it likely didn’t hurt when Crunchbase included them in a story about health and wellness startups. This kind of press release acts a flagpole in the sand for future credibility building for both VC and media.

 

Folx Health Using PR to Elevate Understanding

  • $59 million raised
  • #28 on Fast Company’s list of World’s Most Innovative Companies 2023

Taking Control of their Founding Story

Folx Health is a healthtech platform that provides healthcare services tailored to the LGBTQIA+ community, starting at $59/month. In May 2020, Folx founder A.G. Breitenstein took to Medium to tell how Folx came to be. Although this Medium post is their only Medium post, it shows a particular media savvy. In December that year Folx’s $4.4 million funding led to coverage on Mashable, Built in Boston, and Crunchbase. The Medium post is so important because it is an early flag in the sand about the founding story of the then little-known startup Folx, which is important when a big media announcement hits and suddenly there is a lot of press and a lot of opportunities for the founding story to be misunderstood or misrepresented.

PR to Take a Stand

On the heels of its $30 million raise in October 2022, Folx appears to take control of its narrative again. This time, it does so as a fierce source of information about healthcare’s inadequacy for the queer community. Time after time, Folx uses an intelligent combination of data and storytelling to articulate Folx’s purpose and need to a broader audience. And this time, Folx CEO is the spokesperson for thier entire community: The American healthcare system, “at best, wasn’t built for us. And actually, more often than not, it’s openly discriminatory,” says Liana Douillet-Guzmán, of the LGBTQ community. Folx isn’t simply leveraging purpose-driven PR, they are CULTURALLY purpose-driven, making their PR story all the more attractive.

 

 

All of these hypergrowth healthtech brands provide examples of PR in healthcare brands, but these examples can also be useful for all startups in any phase of growth. Taking ownership of PR in the earliest stages can pay remarkable dividends in the early development and later hypergrowth stages. During times of volatility, PR can be the shining beacon into the future and light the path for future growth, even with past coverage.