Reputation Management

You might be wondering “do I need a PR agency?”.  Have you ever wondered how certain companies stay in the limelight or handle crises so smoothly? The answer often lies with a PR agency, with PR experts at the helm. In a world where brand image and public perception hold immense power, the role of public relations services is crucial. But what exactly does a public relations agency do?

The Role of Public Relations Agencies

At the heart of its operation, a PR agency focuses on shaping and maintaining the public image of businesses, individuals, or organizations. These agencies serve as a vital link connecting clients with various audiences, encompassing potential customers, investors, partners, and employees. They expertly manage relationships, ensuring that the clients are viewed favorably in the public eye.

Crafting the Narrative

A primary function of public relations agencies is crafting and spreading a positive narrative for the clients. This critical role emphasizes the client’s key strengths, notable achievements, and unique selling propositions. Using diverse media channels, these agencies skillfully highlight these aspects, ensuring that the public perception aligns positively with the client’s image. This narrative shaping is a strategic endeavor tailored to resonate with the target audience and broader public.

Crisis Management

PR companies play an essential role in crisis management. When a client faces a scandal, product issues, or other adverse events, these agencies act quickly to limit damage. The unique approach of such companies includes clear communication with the public and strategic steps to rebuild trust in the brand. Effective crisis management involves mitigating immediate fallout and implementing long-term strategies to restore and maintain the client’s positive public image and reputation.

Media Relations

In the realm of PR agencies, media relations are fundamental. These agencies work to secure favorable media coverage for the clients, engaging in activities like pitching stories and arranging interviews. They sometimes handle media inquiries directly, which involves establishing and nurturing relationships with various media outlets and ensuring consistent, positive coverage. This is crucial for maintaining a robust public image and enhancing the client’s visibility and reputation.

Event Management

Public relations agencies excel in event management, a key aspect of the services offered. They organize diverse events, including product launches, press conferences, and public gatherings. They design each event to bolster the client’s public image and increase media presence. The strategic planning and execution of these events aim to attract media attention, engage the audience, and create opportunities for positive publicity, thereby enhancing the client’s overall brand image.

Social Media Management

PR companies’ responsibility extends to managing clients’ social media presence, which involves developing tailored social media strategies, creating engaging content, interacting with followers, and monitoring the client’s online reputation. These social activities are crucial in building and maintaining a positive digital footprint, engaging with the target audience effectively, and ensuring the client’s brand is perceived favorably across various social media platforms.

Influencer Collaborations

PR agencies often leverage influencer collaborations to extend a brand’s reach and credibility. This strategy involves identifying and partnering with the most-followed influencers who share similar values and appeal to the client’s target audience. Through these collaborations, agencies aim to enhance brand visibility and reputation, leveraging the influencers’ reach and influence to create a more relatable and impactful brand narrative, attracting and engaging a wider audience.

The Process: How PR Agencies Work

To fully grasp the importance and functionality of public relations services, it’s vital to understand their process. This understanding sheds light on how these agencies operate and underscore their importance in shaping public perception. By delving into these unique methods – from initial research and strategy development to implementation and ongoing evaluation – you can appreciate the intricate work that goes into managing and enhancing a client’s public image and reputation.

Research and Analysis

The initial phase for any PR agency involves a deep dive into completely understanding the client, which includes analyzing the client’s sector/industry, competitors, target audience, and existing public perception. This comprehensive research is crucial as it lays the foundation for all future strategies. The agency can tailor its approach by gaining insights into these areas, ensuring that the strategies developed are highly specific and effective for the client’s unique situation and needs.

Strategy Development

Following thorough research, the PR agency develops a customized strategy. This strategy outlines specific goals, communicates core messages to the intended target audience, and the selection of appropriate communication channels. The aim is to ensure that every aspect of this strategy aligns perfectly with the client’s objectives and market position. Careful planning at this stage is essential for the success of the subsequent public relations efforts.

Implementation

In the implementation phase, the PR agency puts the plan into action. This plan involves various activities, including writing and distributing press releases, crafting impactful social media content, organizing events, and engaging with media outlets. Each action is meticulously planned and executed to ensure maximum reach and impact. The agency’s expertise in effectively conveying the client’s message across various social media channels/platforms is critical during this stage.

Monitoring and Evaluation

Public relations companies are diligent in monitoring and evaluating campaigns. This process involves tracking media coverage, measuring social media engagement, assessing public sentiment, and analyzing other relevant metrics. By doing so, they can measure the effectiveness of their strategies and make informed choices for future campaigns. This ongoing evaluation is crucial in ensuring that the PR efforts align with the client’s goals and deliver the desired outcomes.

The Impact of Effective PR

Effective PR boosts brand awareness, a key to business growth. PR agencies make a brand more visible and attractive to its audience through targeted campaigns and strategic messaging. This increased awareness is not just about recognition; it’s about creating a familiar and trusted image in the minds of investors, consumers, and partners. By doing so, PR establishes a solid foundation for developing long-term, successful business relationships and fostering sustained business growth.

Beyond visibility, effective PR significantly enhances a company’s reputation in a specific industry/market. Skilled PR management is invaluable in an era where reputation can be made or broken in a moment. By positively shaping public perceptions, good PR can turn negatives into positives, strengthening customer loyalty. Good PR is particularly important in crisis situations, where the right communication can mitigate damage and even improve a company’s overall standing.

The long-term impact of effective PR must be balanced. It’s not just about immediate gains in visibility or reputation; it’s about setting a business up for ongoing success. Consistent, positive PR helps establish a brand as a leader in its field, opening doors to new opportunities, partnerships, and markets. It’s an investment in the future, building a legacy of trust and excellence that endures.

Choosing the Right PR Agency

With numerous agencies out there, choosing the one can be daunting. Look for an agency that understands your industry, has a demonstrated track record, and aligns with your company’s values.

Tailored Approach

Selecting the right PR agency involves finding one that doesn’t just apply generic strategies. A competent agency will invest time in understanding your needs and the specific dynamics of your industry. They will customize their approach, ensuring it aligns perfectly with your business goals and market position. This tailored strategy is vital for effectively addressing your specific challenges and opportunities, thereby maximizing the impact of their PR efforts on your business.

Transparency and Communication

Effective communication and transparency are fundamental when working with a PR agency. The ideal agency will also maintain open lines of communication with your team, keeping everyone informed about the strategies, their progress, and any challenges they face. This transparency is crucial for building a trust-based relationship. It ensures that you are always aware of how your PR investment is being managed and how it contributes to your business’s success.

Result-Oriented

The primary goal in hiring a PR agency is to witness concrete results. The right agency will have a clear plan to achieve specific outcomes, such as increasing media coverage, enhancing your brand’s reputation, or effectively managing crises. They should be able to demonstrate how the strategies will translate into tangible benefits for your business, ensuring that the investment in the services offered leads to measurable improvements in your public image and market presence.

The Future of Public Relations

The future of public relations (PR) is a fascinating topic, especially when considering its evolution from its inception to its current state. In the early 20th century, PR was primarily about press agentry and publicity, focusing on getting a company’s name out into the public sphere, often with little regard for the accuracy or ethics of the message. It was all about creating a buzz, regardless of the substance behind it. However, this traditional approach has drastically changed over the decades.

In the mid-20th century, PR began to evolve into a more sophisticated and strategic field. This era saw the rise of “public relations counsel” – experts who sought to promote clients and advise them on how to behave and communicate. It was no longer just about publicity but shaping perceptions and building a reputable brand image. This period marked the beginning of PR as a strategic communication process, understanding public and engaging with stakeholders.

Today, PR has become an integral part of business strategy. It’s no longer an afterthought or merely a tool for damage control. Modern PR is about building and maintaining relationships with the audience, media, and other stakeholders. It’s about crafting a narrative that resonates with the public and aligns with the company’s values and objectives. The rise of digital media has further expanded the scope of PR, making it more dynamic and immediate. Social media, blogs, podcasts, and other digital platforms have become crucial in disseminating information and engaging with the public.

Looking towards the future, several key trends are likely to shape the PR industry:

Digital Dominance: The future of PR is digital. Social media platforms have already become primary tools for PR professionals to engage with audiences. We can expect more innovative uses, including machine learning and AI, to analyze trends and automate some aspects of PR.

Ethical and Transparent Communication: There’s a growing demand for authenticity and transparency in communication. People are increasingly skeptical of corporate messages and can easily spot inauthentic communication. Future PR will need to be transparent and ethics-driven.

Data-Driven Strategies: Data analytics in PR will become more prevalent. PR professionals will increasingly rely on data gathered by experts to understand audience behavior, measure the effectiveness of social media campaigns, and tailor messages to specific groups.

Integrated Communication Strategies: PR will become more integrated with other forms of marketing and communication. The line between PR, marketing, and advertising is already blurred, and this trend will continue. An integrated approach will be necessary for cohesive brand messages.

Crisis Management in a Digital Age: With the speed at which information spreads online, crisis management will become an even more critical skill for PR professionals. They must be adept at quickly addressing issues before they escalate using traditional and digital media channels.

Increased Focus on Storytelling: The power of storytelling will remain paramount in PR. However, the way stories are told. It will evolve with emerging technologies and changing audience preferences. PR professionals must be experts at crafting narratives that convey the desired message and engage and resonate with audiences across diverse platforms.

Personalization and Customization: As audiences become more fragmented, the one-size-fits-all approach will become less effective. Future PR strategies will need to be more personalized. This approach will require a deeper understanding of different audience groups and their preferences.

Influencer and Community Engagement: Social media influencers and community leaders will continue to play a vital role in shaping public opinion. PR strategies will increasingly include collaboration with these individuals to reach audiences more organically and credibly.

Focus on Measurable Outcomes: There will be a significant emphasis on measuring the impact of PR campaigns. With advanced analytics tools, PR professionals can provide concrete data on how their efforts contribute to a company’s bottom line and elevate the importance of PR.

Adapting to Globalization and Cultural Sensitivity: PR strategies must adjust to different cultural contexts as businesses continue to operate globally. Respecting cultural nuances will be crucial in crafting messages across media that are effective and sensitive to the global audience.

In conclusion, PR agencies are vital in sculpting the public image of businesses and individuals in the ever-evolving landscape. Their expertise in creating compelling narratives and adept crisis management is crucial. These agencies expertly navigate public perceptions, employing strategic communication to uphold and enhance reputations. The role of public relations agencies in today’s fast-paced, image-driven world is beneficial and essential for success in the eyes of the public.

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Do you find yourself asking “What will I get for my money if I hire a PR agency?” You might even see offers for guaranteed media coverage. But should PR agencies guarantee media coverage? The reasons the answer is “no” might surprise you. Any PR agency that promises earned media coverage is putting their journalist contacts at risk for journalistic ethics violations. Guaranteed PR coverage is not only unethical, it can even be illegal. “Guaranteed” PR coverage rarely lives as long as earned media coverage. Finally, it doesn’t have the authority and trust that comes with credible earned media.

[3 minute read]

Pay-to-Play Earned Media is Unethical

Sadly, we’ve seen it all, including journalists fired for violating professional journalist ethics. Violations might include not disclosing a monetary relationship or other conflict or interest. Paying a journalist under the table to write about a company or a product is the signal of an inexperienced, desperate, or unethical PR agency. These agencies don’t garner favor by journalists who value their jobs, and getting a journalist fired isn’t the way to reinforce media relationships. And when you hire a PR agency that does this, you’re attaching your brand’s reputation to unethical and even illegal behavior. No matter how cheap guaranteed PR coverage is, the cost to your reputation will far outweigh any benefits.

There is such a thing as legitimate sponsored coverage. And while sponsored coverage LOOKS like an article, it’s actually an advertisement. Secured through a media outlet’s advertising team, never directly with a journalist, sponsored coverage is a legitimate form of advertising. The FCC always requires sponsored coverage to identify itself as paid. Even Google wants to know what links are sponsored, and not tagging them correctly is an SEO risk authoritative and important media outlets won’t risk. Press releases are a great example of paid or sponsored coverage. Paid placements have a role in a campaign, and any good PR agency can make recommendations about how to use these tools in your campaign.

Guaranteed Coverage Isn’t Usually Authoritative

Fast-growing brands and hyper-growth companies need PR primarily for exposure and trust that typically comes from earned media.

Today’s readers and content consumers are incredibly savvy. After thousands of hours of advertising exposure, most consumers can sniff out the difference between advertising articles and journalistic pieces. Like all advertisements, ethically secured readers’ and viewers’ trust earned coverage because journalists maintain independence.

We’ve seen self-proclaimed PR experts use their positions as media contributors to promote their clients; these same people are banned from esteemed outlets like Entrepreneur and Forbes.  Most times, the brands paying for this coverage did not know that what the “PR expert” was doing was unethical or illegal. No one wins in this situation, certainly not the brand that thought they paid a PR firm to secure high-value coverage. This is especially painful because once discovered by the media outlet, that content is often removed from their website and, therefore the internet; this rarely happens with earned media coverage which lasts as long as the website is up.

Sponsored or Paid Coverage Doesn’t Last as Long

While earned media takes strategy, expertise, and, yes, time, ethical sponsored or paid coverage doesn’t last as long as earned coverage. Sponsored and paid coverage, while it has its place, is like any other advertisement: it typically runs for a limited amount of time, and then it disappears. One of the underappreciated perks of earned media is its longevity.

There’s nothing wrong with sponsored or paid coverage. We’ve seen some really remarkable pieces of sponsored coverage that went beyond the advertisement and well into providing true value for readers. The Washington Post, the New York Times, all do spectacular special projects like this. The starting cost is usually in the $50,000+ range. Regular ad rates for a premium location like the (printed) back page hover around $30,000 per ad, volume discounts usually apply to annual contracts. But hey, you’re getting ad placement in one of the world’s most credible news outlets at least once for that price.

 

The Case for Sponsored or Paid Coverage

Many emerging industries or pre-IPO companies want exposure and they want social proof. The weird thing about exposure is the more you get, the more exposure you’ll get. This is where sponsored coverage comes into play – and it’s essential to understand its role. What you DO with sponsored coverage and how you create the content for sponsored coverage makes all the difference. Working with a modern PR agency can help you distinguish yourself in sponsored or branded coverage and also help you make the most of it. There’s a place for this kind of media in the ecosystem today; it’s important to use it wisely.

 

Today’s modern PR firms are savvy in today’s media landscape, including traditional, paid, and digital mediums. We take our professional PR ethics very seriously, including guaranteed media coverage. Hire a PR firm you can trust and trust your PR firm.

Updated FTC Guidance on Influencer Marketing Disclosure

Updated July 13, 2023

 

The FTC’s job is to preserve consumer trust. When the FTC adds clarity to its regulations, the purpose is usually to make the guidelines more clear, and therefore easier to follow.

This is an important announcement if you use influencer marketing or consumer reviews.

The updated FTC guidance covers:

1) articulating a new principle regarding procuring, suppressing, boosting, organizing, publishing, upvoting, down voting, or editing consumer reviews so as to distort what consumers think of a product; 2) addressing incentivized reviews, reviews by employees and fake negative reviews of a competitor; 3) adding a definition of “clear and conspicuous” and saying that a platform’s built-in disclosure tool might not be an adequate disclosure; 4) changing the definition of “endorsements” to clarify the extent to which it includes fake reviews, virtual influencers, and tags in social media; 5) better explaining the potential liability of advertisers, endorsers, and intermediaries; and 6) highlighting that child-directed advertising is of special concern.

 

 

You can read about the announcement here:

FTC updated guidance on deceptive reviews 

 

May 9, 2017:

Because of continuing conversations with colleagues, brands, and influencers, I wanted to put some guidelines together for based on the FTC’s native advertising guidelines or influencer disclosure.

The FTC has shot some arrows over the bow in the last several years regarding native advertising disclosure, including calling out Warner Bros. and Lord and Taylor.

In both cases, the brand was held liable, not the influencers or content creators, strongly signaling that it’s the brand’s responsibility to ensure disclosure. But, the FTC native advertising guidelines make it clear: ” …the FTC has taken action against other parties who helped create deceptive advertising content – for example, ad agencies and operators of affiliate advertising networks.  Everyone who participates directly or indirectly in creating or presenting native ads should make sure that ads don’t mislead consumers about their commercial nature.”

Basically, no one is off the hook.

As if by magic, the FTC slapped 45 celebrity influencers with warning letters but didn’t forget to include their agents and the brands – in total 90 letters were issued about the FTC native advertising guidelines. It’s safe to say this isn’t going away. It’s always been best practice, but if you didn’t take it seriously before, it’s time to do so now.

My view is this: disclosure and transparency are good for all.

A brand should have no shame about showcasing its products and experiences in a real life scenario. Influencers shouldn’t have shame either, because working with a brand is a badge of honor. It’s a real compliment to a community that a brand values their eyeballs. If you’re ashamed of working with a particular brand or influencer, perhaps you’re working with the wrong partner.

Often times when I have conversations about disclosure with brands and influencers, I get questions like “what if…we do….”

Whether you are a brand or an influencer, if you’re asking questions about how to get around these guidelines, you’re on the wrong track. The guidelines make it very clear: make it obvious to an uneducated viewer that there is a material relationship (basically, anything which might effect the outcome of the endorsement). Influencers are often concerned about “selling out” their community. As an influencer, if you’re making a living from your community with native advertising and you’re not disclosing those relationships, you’re REALLY selling them out.

The Edelman Trust Barometer makes it clear: trust is in crisis. 

Establishing trust and adhering to guidelines is necessary for native advertising and influencer relations to continue. If trust is eroded the FTC guidelines won’t be at fault for the collapse of social native advertising.

So here are the guidelines based on reading hundreds of pages including all of the FTC links provided below.


When do social media influencers need to disclose a relationship with a brand?

Always.

Does this apply to me?

Yes.

Why does it matter?

The FTC says it does.
Consumer trust is important to all of us. 

How do I disclose?

Make it “clear and conspicuous” and leave no doubt.


If you want to read through the FTC’s own words on this:

FTC Native Advertising Guideline Resources

.com Disclosures (2013)

Native Advertising: A Guide For Business

FTC Endorsement Guidelines: What People Are Asking (2015)

The Lord & Taylor Disclosure Case-FTC Blog (2015)

The Warner Bros Disclosure Case-FTC Blog (2015)

Enforcement Policy Statement On Deceptively Formatted Ads (2015)

 

Marketing to influencers and advocates is all the rage, fueled by social media. But if you’ve ever developed a consumer campaign with influencers and/or advocates, you know it can be filled with land mines.
Part of that is what inspires advocates and influencers is different. In my last post about Captivation Motivations, I shared with you the secret driver you’ve already heard of behind so many of our snap decisions and just BARELY touched on rewards and lures.

But they’re actually super closely related to what’s behind our fastest decisions to click, like, join, sign up, or buy. If you’ve played an app or computer game, you’ve probably noticed that these games are getting more addictive (eh, em, Candy Crush anyone?). It’s not just better graphics and faster speeds that are making these games addictive, it’s the deeper understanding of what really motivates people to continue playing and one of those is the power of rewards.

I will get to the secret successful games used in a minute, but first, I want to share something else with you. If you’re thinking of running a giveaway, a promotion, or even thinking of starting an app, you want to keep reading. If you’re using digital and social media to market your brand (and I know you are), you’ll want to keep reading. If you’re doing affiliate marketing, you will want to keep reading.  What I’m about to share with you is essential and will ultimately make or break your product or promotion and even marketing relationships with influencers and advocates, including journalists.

 

You Scratch My Back…Carefully.

The last time someone bought you lunch, I bet your parting words were, “It’s on me next time!” You probably said it without asking where you might go or checking your bank account or calendar. You just blurted it out. The truth is, we’re hard-wired to return favors. Think about that for a minute. We are deeply, sincerely uncomfortable when we think we must return a favor. Next time you run a promotion on Facebook, do a test. Ask people to like the page BEFORE entering the contest and compare that to the results if you ask AFTER you’ve given them something, even if it’s just a chance to win. Chances are you’ll find that if you ask AFTERwards, your conversion percentage goes way up, AND those people remain engaged for longer.
This is because lures trigger our sense of reciprocity.

Want to hear an old-school example of this?
Ever received mailing labels from a nonprofit that you didn’t ask for? Did you know that sending mailing labels with a request for a donation has been shown to DOUBLE donations? And guess what? The average donation is way, way more than the value of the labels.
Why? Because reciprocity is a compelling motivation, and it comes with a quirk: what we give for what we receive has very little to do with the financial value of either. You give something, ANYTHING, of some value without placing a value on it, and the reciprocity trigger kicks in. This is the idea behind successful content marketing.

 

Why You Should Never Pay Your Advocates

There’s a lot of discussion today about influencer and advocate marketing. Lures and rewards are different. Lures give without the expectation on the giver’s part of receiving anything in return. That triggers reciprocity by the receiver.
Rewards are given with the expectation of the receiver to get something in exchange, so no sense of reciprocity is triggered.

Rewards (generally) kill reciprocity, but they can create habits if done correctly (like training your dog).
But it’s tough for marketers to get the consistency required to create a habit. Hell, it’s hard to get the consistency required to create a habit in dog; ask anyone who’s tried.

But marketers can more easily create reciprocity, which is an extremely powerful motivation that rewards do not trigger. Here’s the rub though: reciprocity has some limitations too.
If you offered rewards to those who were already advocating for you to do what they were already doing, you’d see that their desire to support you moving forward would be slipping. That’s because offering a reward on contingency (do this 3X/week and receive that reward) for something someone is ALREADY motivated to do, decreases the desire. And unless you understood this motivational fact, you’d probably be left scratching your head about what happened.
Tread lightly with your advocates, because your appreciation can decrease their motivation if you aren’t careful.

This isn’t to say rewards aren’t effective. They can be very effective. “Share this and receive that…” you see it all the time. That’s a reward, not a lure. Again, ask my dogs. They know if they do something, there’s a good chance there’s a treat for them. That’s a reward; they’ve been conditioned to expect it. Rewards can be potent tools for increasing reach. It creates increased reach by those who AREN’T your advocates; depending on your strategy, that can be very important. Just don’t confuse people you give a reward to as an advocate.

Time: The Biggest Reciprocity Trigger

If you’re really interested in triggering reciprocity, then you should probably do two things:
1) get to know your customer really well
2) think beyond monetary lures (discounts, coupons, even product giveaways).

The reasons for this are two-fold:

Our 90% of the brain (the oldest, largest, and most primitive part of our brain) inherently knows that time is more valuable than items. We inherently value experiences (millennials especially) more than items, so although the default is often a coupon or discount, experiences are more highly valued. Receiving an experience from a product or brand increases reciprocity. So if you use an experience as a reward, you can trigger reciprocity. But to offer a highly valued experience, you really have to know your customer. What YOU think your customer values may differ completely from what they actually value. In the last post, we discussed information seeking as a dopamine trigger, which can also be a reward. So can mastery-this is the essence of gamification. Becoming good at something is its reward and the longer we spend on achieving that reward, the more we value it. Again, what your customers value may include inclusion in a tribe, recognition, or status. All these things can be valuable rewards AND lures for brands.

The other thing to understand is that placing a distinct financial value on a lure (or a reward) kinks up the perceived value. Let me give you an example: If I invited you to dinner at my house for a homemade dinner that was wonderful (of course it would be FABULOUS), but then I spent all night talking about how much I spent on buying the ingredients of the dinner, two things would happen. 1) you would view the dinner as a sum of parts rather than its whole value of time, effort, and community, and 2) you probably wouldn’t feel a sense of reciprocity, no matter how fabulous the dinner was. Don’t force your influencers OR your advocates to view your rewards or lures as a sum of parts by involving money too heavily; it kills goodwill AND reciprocity. This is part of the power of consumer PR – it triggers goodwill and reciprocity with journalists. If you’re going to use rewards or lures, remember, make it something the customer values and think about how to make more valuable than money.

Here’s the bottom line: use rewards for influencers and lures for advocates.

Can you think of a time when a marketing strategy with lures or rewards turned you off? Share them with me here or in social media; it’s a fascinating discussion I love hearing about.

About the Captivation Motivations:

The Captivation Motivations are all built around the “other 90%” of our brain. The part of our brain that is the oldest and most developed part of our brain.

I didn’t make up the Captivation Motivations; I’ve simply been studying them and their effects since 2008. I’ve been testing them in my strategies and tactics, reading and writing about them.
These motivations are not some flash-in-the-pan-do-whats-trendy-now strategy, these are strategies that trigger reactions from the oldest part of our brain. Over the last few years, more and more has been understood about these motivations. But one thing is clear: even though these motivations developed in the earliest days of humanity’s survival of the fittest experiences, these motivations are very much alive and well today. What triggers them in the modern world differs from what triggered them in our earliest evolutionary days.

Ever notice the best people always seem to go to the best companies? Why is that? Reputation matters and PR improves recruiting outcomes. The magical part is this: it doesn’t matter whether you’re recruiting for executives or recent graduates, a strategic PR plan makes attracting the right talent easier and even keeps your best employees.

  1. Strong Brand Values Attract The Right Candidates

    You want candidates to be a good fit for your company’s culture and values. This is one way PR improves recruiting, especially important for companies in emerging industries and hyper-growth companies who may not have the resources for fancy employment retention programs. Your PR should underscore your company’s values and contributions to society, your industry, and yes, your employees. And candidates who care about culture are more valuable employees. Brand values are an inside-out job. But you should celebrate those values with purpose-driven activations with recruitment in mind. Not every activation is worthy of the Wall Street Journal, but if that’s a goal, then make it newsworthy. Otherwise, this is where social media can be an outstanding messenger of your PR initiatives. But make no doubt about it, the best candidates do a Google search and check out your social profiles before they accept your job offer.

  2. Give Employees an Opportunity to Brag

    Everyone wants to work in a place where their co-workers are happy to be there. Here, activate your earned media with your employees. Every time you receive coverage, be sure to tell your employees and let them brag about the company to their friends and community. You can encourage sharing with recruitment bonuses, and other internal spotlights on employees who share your good news far and wide. Employee advocacy is a really effective way that PR can improve recruiting. There’s another benefit to encouraging employees to share content:

  3. Reduce Employee Turnover with PR

    Everyone wants to feel proud of where they work, and the more they talk about how proud they are, the more committed they become to that feeling of loyalty and pride. That’s a Captivation Motivation fact, it’s akin to sunk costs. The more we sink into something, the harder it is to walk away. So PR improves recruiting through increased employee pride, and that pride reduces costly turnover. It’s a lot harder to complain about your job on social media if you’re regularly posting about how much you love your company and job.

  4. Reputation Management Matters

    You definitely want someone monitoring your overall reputation. That includes everything a potential candidate might see from Glass Door to news coverage and even reviews. You also want someone to identify how certain audiences perceive your overall communications and what you can do to improve your communications. For example, if you’re emphasizing diversity, equity, and inclusion in your recruitment, but no one on your website reflects DEI values, it feels very shallow and unwelcoming to those candidates. Do your job descriptions match the education levels and pay ranges you’re hiring for?   If you’re hiring for people with college degrees, those job descriptions should look and feel differently than your job descriptions for roles that don’t require a college degree. Consider blind hiring initiatives that remove age, gender, race, location, and even college degree from the search qualifications.

  5. Appeal To The Ego

    When high-potential or high-level candidates see that news articles and media coverage of company executives, that’s a pretty compelling benefit for ambitious executives. It’s an outstanding way for your company to attract talent, even in the tightest recruitment markets. Plus, your that coverage adds benefits to your company’s brand values as well. Make sure your recruitment pages include executive coverage so potential employees can envision thier own name in the headlines too.

 

Using PR to improve recruiting outcomes is only one of the ways PR supports the most important business strategies, read more about the other 5 ways PR improves business outcomes.